January Term Course Descriptions

January 2019

Chemistry of Cooking

CHEM 011 (CRN 10007)

Instructor: Elisabeth Wade
Limit: 16
Room: NSB 212

Schedule:
Jan 2-3, 7-10, 14-17, 1:00-4:30 pm

The methods of preparation of food for human consumption will be used to learn about the molecular nature of matter and the chemical and physical changes during food preparation. Topics will include: mass, volume, and temperature measurement; the food molecules of water, carbohydrates, proteins, and fats; acids and bases; emulsions, foams, and suspensions. This framework will allow discussion of how we learn more about the material world through scientific investigation. Core Curriculum: Scientific Inquiry


Radical Departures: Fin de Siècle Literature

ENG 180J (CRN 10010)

Instructor: Rebekah Edwards

Schedule:
On Campus class meeting: Friday, Jan 25 2:00-5:00 pm in Heller Rare Book Room
Online Class meetings: January 2-11

This class is interested in literary and artistic movements of the 1860's to 1900's in Paris, London, Berlin, and New York, San Francisco and Vienna. In its simplest definition, “fin de siècle” refers to the end of a century, yet at the end of the 19th century, the term did not just refer to a set of dates, but rather a whole set of artistic, moral, and social concerns. To describe something as a fin de siècle phenomenon invokes a sense of the old order ending and new, radical departures. Core Curriculum: Critical Analysis and Creativity, Innovation, and Experimentation (pending)


The US/Mexico Border: An Immersive Experience

ENVS 180J

Instructor: Lisa Urry
Schedule:
Jan 11-19 in Nogales, AZ

With the adoption of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), The US Mexico border region has increasingly come into the public spotlight. It has been the site of massive deportations of undocumented migrants, and the US Government has built a wall along that border that today measures 700 miles (of a 1954-mile border). The proposed course is designed to provide an immersive experience on the US/Mexican border, including travel in both countries, in-depth discussions with U.S., Mexican, and cross-border organizations, and interactions with local social activists. Core: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, and Community Engagement (pending)


Afrofuturism

ETHS 180J

Instructor: Tanarive Due
Schedule:
This course will be conducted primarily online, with 1–2 in-person meeting(s) TBD.

This course will introduce students to Afrofuturism—or the Black Speculative Arts (science fiction, fantasy and horror)—from the themes and images in Black Panther and Sorry to Bother You to W.E.B. DuBois’s post-apocalyptic short story “The Comet” (1920) to the music of Janelle Monáe, George Clinton and P-Funk to the fiction of pioneering authors such as Nnedi Okorafor, Samuel R. Delany and Octavia E. Butler. Students will discuss the impact and relevance of such work on present-day examinations of race, gender roles, feminism, ethnicity and culture, with particular emphasis on leadership models, dystopia, and imagining black futurity.

Tananarive Due is a prolific and award-winning novelist who has been honored with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Image Award in 2001 for The Black Rose, the 2002 American Book Award for her novel, The Living Blood, and the Black Issues Book Review Award in 2003 for the "Best Civil Rights Memoir" for Freedom in the Family. Core Curriculum: Critical Analysis, and Race, Gender, and Power (pending)


Negotiations

MGMT 227 (CRN 10002)

Instructors: Jessica Notini & Carolyn Sherwood Call
Limit: 20/ WL: 10
Classroom: GSB 109

Schedule:
Mon 1/7 9:00 am-5:00 pm
Thu 1/10 9:00 am-5:00 pm
Sat 1/12 9:00 am-4:00 pm
Thu 1/17 9:00 am-5:00 pm
Sat 1/19 9:00 am-3:30pm

The course examines the dynamics that occur before, during, and after negotiations and the theory behind various negotiation approaches. Topics to be addressed will include: claiming versus creating value (also known as distributive and integrative bargaining); preparation strategies; the nature of power; psychological aspects of negotiation; experience and expertise; multi-party/group negotiations; culture and gender; communications and perception; mediation and other alternative dispute resolution systems; working with lawyers; and organizational change and salary negotiations.


PLEN: DC Seminar on Women in Public Policy

PPOL 180JA (CRN 10005)

Instructor: Mark Henderson
Limit: 15
Credit: 2 semester course credits
Schedule: Jan 7-11  in Washington, DC

This one week seminar in Washington, DC will offer students a valuable opportunity to hear firsthand from women activists and advocates. The public policy arena offers endless opportunities, from government service to issue-based advocacy. Students will learn from leaders on Capitol Hill, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and private corporations. Jan 9-13 in Washington, DC. Students will submit a reflection paper upon their return, which is required for academic credit.

Schedule Note: Students are responsible for their own airfare and hotel. PLEN has scholarships to support student travel, and more detail is available at www.plen.org.


PLEN: DC Seminar on Women in STEM Policy

PPOL 180JB (CRN 10006)

Instructor: Mark Henderson
Limit: 15
Credit: 2 semester course credits
Schedule: January 14-18 in Washington, DC

This one-week seminar in Washington, DC will offer students a valuable opportunity to hear firsthand from women in science, health, and technology who are shaping our nation's STEM agenda.  Students will visit organizations where policy research takes place and will meet leaders in STEM policy. Jan 2-6 in Washington, DC. Students will submit a reflection paper upon their return, which is required for academic credit.

Schedule Note: Students are responsible for their own airfare and hotel. PLEN has scholarships to support student travel, and more detail is available at www.plen.org.


Visions of Resistance: Campaigns for Liberation in Dire Times

SOC 180J (CRN 10008)

Instructor: Jess Heaney, Critical Resistance + guest speakers

Campaigns and projects to fight the violence of policing and imprisonment have a rich history in the Bay area, where diverse communities have joined forces to fight for health and self-determination instead of punishment. Drawing from the history of Critical Resistance, a locally-based national grassroots abolitionist organization, this course will explore campaign and visual messaging strategies of community-led efforts to halt prison and jail construction, end racist policing policies, and challenge other facets of the prison industrial complex (PIC). The course will pose abolition as a strategy to dismantle systems of harm and punishment in favor of systems that increase health, stability, and self-determination. Class components will include foundational political education workshops on the PIC, abolitionist theory and practice (including alternatives to policing), complemented by discussions with local movement organizers. Students will put these lessons to work by developing visual materials and propaganda to support current campaigns against jail expansion and policing.

Jess Heaney is the Development Director for Critical Resistance. Critical Resistance was formed in 1997 when activists challenging the idea that imprisonment and policing are a solution for social, political, and economic problems came together to organize a conference that examined and challenged what we have come to call the prison industrial complex (PIC).


Gender, Displacement, and (Slow) Disaster Movies

WGSS 180K (CRN 10009)

Instructor: Bidita Tithi
Schedule:
This course will be conducted partially online, with some in-person meetings TBD.

This course is designed to analyze (and challenge) the conventions of what we understand by 'natural' disasters and disaster movies. An interdisciplinary approach will be used to examine films that such as Beasts of the Southern Wild, Ashani Sanket (Distant Thunder) and Life,And Nothing More using concepts from Feminist Theory, Disaster Studies, Environmental Humanities and Transnational Cultural Studies. Specific topics that will be explored include precarious living, power relations and vulnerabilities, displacement, gendered nature(s) of disaster, and the politics of legitimizing the spatial and temporal boundaries of the destruction and trauma related to a disaster. As part of the course, students will get the opportunity to work collaboratively on a group project on an under-studied environmental disaster of their choice. Core Curriculum: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, and Race, Gender, and Power