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Home > Academics > Undergraduate > History >
History
Course Description

EXPANDED
HIST 137
Prosperity, Depression, and War: America from 1920 to 1945

Description

This course begins with the tumultuous year 1919 and covers the social, cultural, and political events of the 1920s, the Great Crash and Depression of the 1930s, the impact of the crash and depression on society, politics, and government policy, U.S. international relations from World War I through World War II. Americans during this period witnessed the Red Scare, thirteen years of Prohibition, the “flappers” and bootleggers, the rise of a new Ku Klux Klan, controversies over Darwinism and evolution, the development of modern consumerism and the rise of mass culture, including the movies and radio broadcasting, the New Deal, and the outbreak of a global war and the beginning of the Atomic Age.

Special emphasis will be placed on California and the San Francisco Bay Area during this period, including the role of women and gender and the impact of war on San Francisco and Oakland social and cultural life. Controversies related to class, race, ethnicity, and religion marked this period in ways that resonate even today, and special emphasis will be given to describing and explaining controversies related to these issues.

Students will have an opportunity to learn about the resources of local historical archives and museums and to conduct original research at the History Center of the San Francisco Main Public Library and the Oakland History Center of the Oakland Main Library.

This course is open to all students, no prerequisites.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirement(s): Historical Perspectives.

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Contact Information

P: 510.430.2338
F: 510.430.2304
E: history@mills.edu

Last Updated: 6/22/17