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Home > Academics > Undergraduate > History >
History
Course Description

EXPANDED
HIST 111
Cuisine History

Description

From first foods to fancy foodies, we study the history of food in the world's cultures with special attention to gender roles in food preparation and consumption. What was the significance of the emergence of cooking, the domestication of plants, and the use of pottery? The great civilizations of the ancient world were built on grain: wheat and rice, and many people still survive on these around the world. The "Columbian Exchange" introduces corn, potatoes, and tomatoes into the diet of a Europe that also adopts coffee and tea and then spreads its foods around the world

We next discuss the emergence of haute cuisine and the restaurant in France. The coming of gas and electricity to the kitchen, improved freezing techniques (ice cream!), the hotel and the restaurant, and the spread of fork use are all part of the modern culinary world. We look at nouvelle cuisine in its many variations and the rise of the "foodie." How sustainable is our present food system? Issues of body image and vegetarianism will also be addressed. We also discuss popular foods such as the rise of chocolate and the history of the hamburger-McDonalds. Student projects explore the relationship of food and culture.

This course is open to all students, no prerequisites.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirement(s): Historical Perspectives, Women and Gender.

Offered Spring 2016.

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Last Updated: 6/22/17