Back to Undergraduate

Areas of Study

Art & Technology
Art History
Art Studio
Asian Studies
Athletics, Physical Education, & Recreation
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Biology
Biopsychology
Book Art
Business Administration
Business Economics
Chemistry
Child Development
Chinese
Computer Science
Dance
Data Science
Economics
Education
English
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
French & Francophone Studies
Global Humanities & Critical Thought
Government
» History
Individualized Major
International Relations
Journalism
Latin American Studies
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Politics, Economics, Policy & Law
Psychology
Public Health & Health Equity
Public Policy
Queer Studies
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish & Spanish American Studies
Theater Studies
Women, Leadership & Social Change
Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies

Accelerated Degree Programs

Bachelor's-to-Master's Degrees

Preprofessional Programs

Pre-Nursing Certificate
Medicine/Health Sciences

Summer Bridge Programs

Hellman Program
Summer Academic Workshop (SAW)

Home > Academics > Undergraduate > History >
History
Course Description

EXPANDED
HIST 011
History The West and Its Cultural Traditions I

Description

We survey Western World history, paying special attention to the daily lives of women and men across different social classes in prehistory, the great agrarian civilizations of the Fertile Crescent (present-day Iraq) and Egypt, followed by the coming of monotheism among the ancient Egyptians and Jews. Classical Greek civilization and the foundations of modern philosophy are followed by the rise and fall of ancient Rome. We examine the rise of Christianity and Islam, then turn to the Middle Ages, the Black Death, the European Renaissance and Reformation, and end with the rise of science at the time of Galileo.

Throughout we focus on the lives of women such as Hatshepsut, ancient Egypt's only woman pharaoh; Diotima, the teacher of Socrates; Boudicca, who led a revolt of the early Britons against imperial Rome; and Christine de Pizan, said to be the first to earn a living by writing. Students write short genealogical histories of their own families to see how they fit into some of the larger historical trends discussed in class and experience how historians do research.

This is an introductory course that is open to all students, no prerequisites.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirement(s): Historical Perspectives, Written Communication II.

Program Information
Overview

Faculty and Staff

Requirements

Courses
Full Course List

History Course List

Schedule of Courses for
the Current Semester


Activities & Resources
American Historical Association Blog

Contact Information

P: 510.430.2338
F: 510.430.2304
E: history@mills.edu

Last Updated: 6/22/17