Back to Undergraduate

Areas of Study

Art & Technology
Art History
Art Studio
Asian Studies
Athletics, Physical Education, & Recreation
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Biology
Biopsychology
Book Art
Business Administration
Business Economics
Chemistry
Child Development
Chinese
Computer Science
Dance
Data Science
Economics
Education
English
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
» Ethnic Studies
French & Francophone Studies
Global Humanities & Critical Thought
Government
History
Individualized Major
International Relations
Journalism
Latin American Studies
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Politics, Economics, Policy & Law
Psychology
Public Health & Health Equity
Public Policy
Queer Studies
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish & Spanish American Studies
Theater Studies
Women, Leadership & Social Change
Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies

Accelerated Degree Programs

Bachelor's-to-Master's Degrees

Preprofessional Programs

Pre-Nursing Certificate
Medicine/Health Sciences

Summer Bridge Programs

Hellman Program
Summer Academic Workshop (SAW)

Home > Academics > Undergraduate > Ethnic Studies >
Ethnic Studies
Course Description

EXPANDED
Ethnic Studies 139
Asian/Pacific Diasporic Women Writers: Narratives of Immigration and Transnationalism

Description
This semester, we will read literary works written by Asian Diasporic and Pacific Islander women that concern immigration and transnationalism. By considering issues of race/ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality, as well as matters of language, notions of origin, and Orientalism, we will focus on expanding our interpretations of the texts, the worlds these texts invent, as well as the everyday world. In our reading, we will pay attention to the politics of literature, and we will explore various notions of diaspora. We will also investigate how these texts invent characters that are able to resist racist or sexist representations, and how these texts may also participate in such subjection. Making use of concepts like hybridity, as well as other theoretical terms, we will begin to look beyond oversimplified binaries such as Asia / America, or traditional / modern. This course will also provide an introduction to literary theory.

Reading List (subject to change)
Patrica Grace, Tu
Jessica Hagedorn, Dogeaters
Yi yun Li, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers
lê thi diem thúy, The Gangster We Are All Looking For
Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
intranet course reader: go to Mills library catalog, search by courses OR search by instructor 

Course Requirements
Two 8-10 page analytical essays
Written assignments
Presentations
Final examination 

Grading Policies
Work received ONE day late will not be penalized. Work received more than one day late will not receive full credit, and will be further penalized according to lateness.

NOTE: The Department of Ethnic Studies takes plagiarism very seriously. Any paper that includes plagiarized material will receive an F grade. Additional consequences include receiving a failing grade for the entire course and being reported to college authorities. If you have any questions about how to cite secondary material, including internet resources, please ask your professor.
If you think you may have a disability or health issue that affects your learning abilities, please contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 430-2264. 

 

Program Information
Overview

Faculty and Staff

Requirements

Courses
Full Course List

Ethnic Studies Course List

Schedule of Courses for
the Current Semester



Activities & Resources


Research Justice at the Intersections

Meet Ethnic Studies Alumnae

Latina Heritage Month

Native American Heritage Month

Black History Month

Pow Wow

SAMEAPI Awareness Now!

Ethnic Studies Events

Ethnic Studies Fund

Women of Color Resource Center

Diversity at Mills

Contact Information

P: 510.430.2080
F: 510.430.2067
E: ethnic_study@mills.edu

Last Updated: 6/22/17