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Research Justice at the Intersections

Connie Wun
Connie Wun
Postdoctoral Scholar, College of Education, University of Illinois, Chicago

Disappeared Subjects: Girls of Color, School Discipline and Punishment

My research project is two-fold. First, I intend to revise my dissertation, Disappeared Subjects: Girls of Color, School Discipline and Punishment, into a book manuscript. This will include re-analyzing my data such that its intersectional framework will include examining sexuality and nationality as variables that shape the experiences that girls of color have with disciplinary policies and practices. Additionally, given that my work continues to be informed by Black feminist scholarship, the revisions will attend to the particularities of anti-Blackness as it relates to the ways that race, gender, class, sexuality and nationality inform discipline and punishment in schools. Second, I will begin my next research project, Digital Formations: Race, Gender, Sexuality, Schools and Social Media, which examines the relationship between social media, surveillance, race, gender and sexuality—particularly for girls of color.

Biography

Dr. Connie Wun is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois, Chicago in the College of Education. She completed her PhD in Education at the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley. Dr. Wun has worked as an educator, youth advocate, anti-prison, and anti-violence against women of color activist for nearly two decades. Her research focuses on the intersections of race, gender and sexuality with a particular interest in school violence, discipline and punishment. Dr. Wun's current project examines the different ways that formal and informal discipline practices shape the academic and personal lives of black and non-black girls of color. Her work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Office, UC Berkeley’s Center for Race and Gender, and the UC Berkeley Initiative for Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity (formerly the Haas Diversity Research Initiative). She has also published in Educational Philosophy and Theory, The Journal for Curriculum and Teaching, Critical Sociology, Berkeley Review of Education and The Feminist Wire.

Research Justice at the Intersections

Overview

RJI Scholars Program

2015-16 Scholars

Last Updated: 9/5/17